UW Theatre for Youth welcomes patrons of all abilities to our performances and will do our best to meet all accessibility requests. Our accessibility coordinator, Molly Mattaini, can be reached at mattaini@wisc.edu.

Please click on the appropriate location for the show you will be attending. There, you can find information on accessibility options and a social story for each location (written by Molly Mattaini).

UW-Madison Fredric March Play Circle

Taliesin Preservation

UW-Madison Fredric march play circle

 

Physical Accessibility

Please let the bow office staff know about any accessibility requests when you are ordering your tickets. You can call the box office at 608-265-2787 or make a note when submitting a ticket request online. The theatre is on the second floor but there is elevator access to the lobby. You can find accessibility information for the entire Memorial Union building on this page: https://union.wisc.edu/visit/accessibility/

Accessibility for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Unfortunately, we are not able to offer an ASL interpreted show for this production. If you would like an assisted listening device, you can call the box office or make a note when ordering your tickets, and they will have the device ready for you at the box office.

Accessibility for the Visually Impaired

Unfortunately, we are not able to offer a touch tour or audio-described performance of this production. There will be lobby materials available for touch interaction before the show.

Loud Noises

This production will include loud noises. If a member of your party is sensitive to sound, we suggest that you bring ear protection from home.

Social Story

What is a Social Story?

A social story is a written/visual guide to a social situation created for people with autism. It provides a visual narrative to a new situation, which often eases anxiety about encountering something new. Many major American children’s theatres have borrowed the social story concept from the field of special education, and now publish social stories for their

performances so that their patrons on the Autism spectrum have to option of reading the social story before seeing the show. Below is the social story for the experience of seeing a show at the Memorial Union's Frederic March Play Circle.

 
 

 

Social Story: Memorial Union

The Play

I am going to see a play at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. A play is a pretend story that real people act out for me to watch. 

Entrance

I will go in the doors to the Memorial Union.

 Tickets

When I enter the building I will see a window with “Box Office” in big letters up top. This is where I will pick up my ticket for the show. A ticket is a little piece of paper that says the name of the show I am going to see. I might have to wait in a line to pick up my ticket.

Getting to the Theatre

Getting to the theatre can be tricky. I have 2 choices. I can go up the elevator to the second floor.

Or I can go up the stairs. To get to the stairs, I need to go down a little set of stairs across from the box office.

And then go down the hall

And then turn to the right to go up another set of stairs

I will climb up one floor on the stairs and then I will turn to the left to enter the lobby.

Lobby

The lobby is a place where the people coming to see the show (like me!) can sit and wait for the performance to begin.

I can sit on a couch or on a chair while I wait.

Restrooms

If I have to go to the restroom before the performance, I can take the elevator up to the 4th floor where there is a family restroom. This is also a good spot to take a quiet break before or during the show.

Entering the Theatre

When it is time to go into the theatre, an usher will be standing at the door. An usher is a person who works for the theater. Their job to is to take my ticket.

After the usher takes my ticket, I will go into a little room on my way into the theatre.

I will go through the little room, and through another door to go into the theatre.

I will walk down the hallway, and then turn around to find my seat.

For this show, I am allowed to take whatever seat my grown-up and I decide we like best. Once I sit down, I will try my best to stay in my seat during the performance.

When I am sitting down, I will be able to see the stage. The stage is the part of the theater that only the actors are allowed to use. The seats are for the audience (like me!) to use.

 

Beginning of the Performance

When the performance is about to begin, the lights will go down. I might hear a person making an announcement or some music. This is all a part of the play!

Watching the Show

I will try my best to stay in my seat during the performance. If I have a question for my grown-up, I will try to ask quietly

Actors

I will see real people, called actors, on the stage when the show starts. The actors are real people, but they are playing pretend characters.

 this is a picture of the actors practicing for a show.

this is a picture of the actors practicing for a show.

Because the actors are playing pretend, sometimes the actors will pretend to be something they aren’t in real life. There might be girl actors pretending to be boys, or people pretending to be animals. This is a part of the pretend story.

Loud Noises

There will be some loud noises during the show. If the noises are too loud, I can cover my ears with my hands or with headphones. If it is still too loud, I can take a break.

Taking a Break

If I need to take a break during the show, I can ask my grown up to come with me out to the lobby, where we were sitting before the show started. Or, if I want to go to an even more quiet place, I can go up the fourth floor where they have some really comfy chairs.

If I decide I want to go back into the performance, I can quietly go back into the theater and sit in my seat.

Clapping

When the play is over, I can clap my hands and cheer for the actors when they come out to take their bows.

Leaving

When the actors leave the stage and the lights come back up, it means the play is over. I might have to wait to get out of my seat until the other people sitting by me are ready to get up. I will do my best to wait quietly.

As soon as the show is over, it is ok to talk. My grown up and I can talk about what we liked and didn’t like in the play.

Taliesin Preservation

 

Physical Accessibility

Physical accessibility options for patrons with mobility impairments are limited in this historic space. If you would like to arrange accommodations for a patron with limited mobility, please email mattaini@wisc.edu at soon as possible and we will do everything we can to accommodate you.

Accessibility for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Unfortunately, we are not able to offer an ASL interpreted show for this production. Please email mattaini@wisc.edu if a member of your party is hard of hearing and we can arrange a reserved seat for them closets to the stage.

Accessibility for the Visually Impaired

Unfortunately, we are not able to offer a touch tour or audio-described performance of this production. Please email mattaini@wisc.edu if a member of your party is visually impaired and we can arrange a reserved seat for them closets to the stage. We will be creating some touch-friendly education materials. Please email if you want to arrange for these materials to be used for your class.

Loud Noises

This production may include loud noises. If a member of your party is sensitive to sound, we suggest that you bring ear protection from home.

Social Story

What is a Social Story?

A social story is a written/visual guide to a social situation created for people with autism. It provides a visual narrative to a new situation, which often eases anxiety about encountering something new. Many major American children’s theaters have borrowed the social story concept from the field of special education, and now publish social stories for their performances so that their patrons on the Autism spectrum have to option of reading the social story before seeing the show. Below is the social story for the experience of seeing a show at the Taliesin Preserve.

 
 

Social Story: TAliesin

The Play

I am going to see a play at Taliesin. A play is a pretend story that real people act out for me to watch. 

Lobby

The lobby is a place where the people coming to see the show (like me!) can and wait for the performance to begin. The lobby at Taliesin looks like this.

Entering the Theatre

When it is time to go into the theatre, I will follow my class to go find our seats. We will walk into a room with a bunch of chairs. My teacher will let me know which chair is for me.

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I might have to go down the stairs to get to my seat. I will be careful on the stairs!

When I am sitting down, I will be able to see the stage. The stage is the part of the theater that only the actors are allowed to use. The seats are for the audience (like me!) to use.

Beginning of the Performance

When the performance is about to begin, the lights will go down. I might here a person making an announcement or some music. This is all a part of the play!

Watching the Show

I will try my best to stay in my seat during the performance. If I have a question for my grown-up, I will try to ask quietly.

Actors

I will see real people, called actors, on the stage when the show starts. The actors are real people, but they are playing pretend characters.

 This is a picture of actors rehearsing for a play.

This is a picture of actors rehearsing for a play.

Because the actors are playing pretend, sometimes the actors will pretend to be something they aren’t in real life. There might be girl actors pretending to be boys, or people pretending to be animals. This is a part of the pretend story.

Loud Noises

There may be some loud noises during the show. If the noises are too loud, I can cover my ears with my hands or with headphones. If it is still too loud, I can take a break.

Taking a Break

If I need to take a break during the show, I can ask my grown up to come with me out to the lobby, where we waited for the show to start.

If I decide I want to go back into the performance, I can quietly go back into the theater and back to my seat.

Clapping

When the play is over, I can clap my hands and cheer for the actors when they come out to take their bows.

Leaving

When the actors leave the stage and the lights come back up, it means the play is over. I might have to wait to get out of my seat until the other people sitting by me are ready to get up. I will do my best to wait quietly.

As soon as the show is over, it is ok to talk. I can talk to the other people in my class about we liked about the play.